BLACKBOX

Applied Neuroscience +
Neuroevents + Neurodesign

BlackBox provides the next step in product development, research, and communications. Our solutions are based on in-depth understanding of human experience obtained by advanced brain-imaging technology.

TRUSTED BY


The conscious | old paradigm

Data about consumers is collected using surveys, interviews, and focus groups. The old paradigm is based on the flawed behaviourist assumption that individuals are capable of credibly expressing their feelings and preferences, and rationally explaining the reasons for their purchase decisions.

 

 

The unconscious | new paradigm

Modern neuroscience proved that a major part of human experience happens at the unconscious level of the mind. This means that people cannot accurately explain what motivates their behaviour and how they really experience products, brands, and communications. The conscious mind is only the tip of the iceberg.

A new paradigm

Transforming emotions into data.

Using advanced biotechnology we provide direct insight into unconscious levels of the mind crucial for in-depth understanding of consumer behaviour. The data is collected with high-resolution multichannel EEG equipment that focuses on the brain - the locus where feelings, emotions, and thoughts emerge.

Due to a higher universality of brain structures, EEG technology enables to acquire more accurate data about consumer needs, desires, and preferences on a significantly smaller sample than traditional marketing research.

 

Scientific references

Scientific references

Our work is based on the following scientific references:

 

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  • Ohme, R., Wiener, D., Reykowska, D., Choromanska, A. (2009): Analysis of Neurophysiological Reactions to Advertising Stimuli by Means of EEG and Galvanic Skin Response Measures. Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics 2009, Vol. 2, No. 1, 21–31.
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Metrics

Direct insight into the quality of experience.

One of the brain’s primary functions is collecting and processing sensory information from the environment. As the brain interprets this information, it generates experiences. Using advanced brain-imaging technology, it is therefore possible to measure the quality of experience directly, and predict behavior related to products, packaging, concepts, ideas, brands, and communications. We provide the following neuroexperience metrics:

 

Human attention is, by nature, selective, shiftable, and dispersed. In contemporary, information saturated society it is hence extremely difficult to get noticed. Using EEG and eye tracking technology, we scientifically measure and optimise the attention potential of brands, products, services, packaging and communications.
With the help of EEG technology we measure the left-right asymmetry of the frontal lobe of the neo-cortex that is related to positive or negative emotional response. Higher intensity of positive emotional response to your products and communications correlates with better consumer experience and higher purchase intent.
Using the latest scientific methods, we detect and analyse unconscious processes of memory encoding. This enables us to determine to which extent selected stimuli will be memorized and to predict the level of recall.
Research design

Research design

Methodology in five steps.

In collaboration with the client, we prepare a research plan that includes the main procedures, goals, and timeline of a neuromarketing study. We nurture close partner relationships and are committed to dynamic adaptation of our solutions to the client’s needs.

 

Defining the client's needs

The client presents their needs and the known parameters of the marketing problem.

Relevant stimuli identification

On the basis of the client’s needs we determine the relevant stimuli, which brain response of consumers is going to be measured for.

Determining the sample

Sample determination involves taking into account the segmentation, target segment, and desired (re)positioning.

Data collection and analysis

We collect data using EEG and eye-tracking technology. The collected data is then statistically analysed and interpreted.

Research report

The interpreted data is translated into a research report with actionable business insights.

 

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Solutions

Using advanced neurotechnology
to create value.

The highly competitive business environment is simply too demanding to allow key marketing problems to be addressed based on subjective assessments and trial-and-error approach. Using advanced brain-imaging technology, we provide companies with accurate understanding of their consumers, with the help of which they can make scientifically informed marketing decisions.

Our solutions enable to develop brain friendly products, reduce the risk of business failure, increase value for consumers, increase your company’s competitive advantage, plan marketing strategies more efficiently, create more effective communications and obtain better business results at lower costs.

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Research

Actionable business insights.

In 2011, reputable American organisation Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) stated that ignoring the potential of Neuromarketing amounts to “competitive folly”. Marketing research amplified by brain-imaging technology is already used by the most successful global companies including Intel, Paypal, Apple, Google, Pepsi, Daimler Benz, and Hyundai.

 

By meassuring unconscious brand experiences in the brain of consumers we help our clients to make informed strategic decisions related to brand building, brand extension, brand identity, and brand positioning.

  • Neuro-brand experience

    Using neuroscience we measure brand experience of the consumers in the selected market segment. This enables to track brand performance over time and determine brand equity in the unconscious.

  • Neuro-optimisation of brand elements

    With the help of the analysis of consumers’ unconscious brain response to the selected brand elements and attributes (name, logo, colour, sound, taste, forms, etc.), we identify the necessary improvements.

  • Neuro-optimised brand concept development

    In all phases of brand development or extension, it enables to neuroscientifically determine the most efficient attributes and conceptual designs.

How do consumers really respond to a selected product or service? In product development and testing, we provide insight into unconscious brain response that is crucial for consumer purchase decisions and quality of experience.

  • Quality of consumer experience

    We measure unconscious brain response of consumers to a selected product or service through each of the five senses: sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Based on this we help to increase the value of products and services for consumers.

  • Neuro-optimised product development

    In all development phases it determines the unconscious brain response of consumers to development concepts, variations, and characteristics of the product, and enables to choose the most effective solutions.

  • Neuro-comparison of products

    It delivers a comparative analysis of unconscious responses between the selected product and one or more competitive products within a certain product category. This enables to map out the competitive environment of the selected product and identify the most effective approaches and solutions within the category.

The package is the first direct impression of the product. As the majority of purchase decisions are made at the point of purchase, it is essential to design brain-friendly packaging.

  • Neuro-testing of package efficiency

    Using our brain-imaging technology, we pinpoint the most and the least effective elements of packaging, and suggest necessary refinements.

  • Neuro-optimised package design and development

    Measurement of unconscious brain response in all development phases enables to design packaging so that it efficiently addresses the brain of consumers in the target segment.

  • Neuro-comparison of packaging

    Brain response to selected packaging is compared to the response to other versions of the packaging for the same product or with the response to competitive packaging. This enables to determine the efficiency of selected packaging and identify the best package solutions in the product category.

Consumers always weigh between the value of the product and the price they are willing to pay for it. BlackBox helps you optimise the price so that it activates the feelings of reward in the brain.

  • Price neuro-optimisation

    By analysing consumer brain response to reward and danger, we determine the optimal price for selected products or services.

Marketing communications are too important to be left to the artistic inspiration of advertisers. Our technology enables to scientifically measure the effectiveness of various forms of marketing communications and neuro-optimise them.

  • Neuro-testing of marketing communications effectiveness

    With millisecond accuracy, we analyse unconscious brain response to advertisements and other forms of marketing communications. On this basis, we then determine, which aspects of the message are the most and which the least effective, and suggest improvements.

  • Neuro-optimisation of marketing communications

    Marketing communications are the most effective if neuro-optimisation is included in their design from the start. We measure unconscious brain response for all key aspects of advertisements, from the concept and storyboard to music and visual elements, which enables to choose optimal solutions.

  • Neuro-comparison of marketing communications

    On the level of unconscious brain response, we compare advertisements to selected competitive advertisements. This enables to test the effectiveness of a message in relation to competition and determine the best communication solutions for the category.

User friendly is brain friendly, especially on the web.

  • Neuro-testing of web communications

    Using advanced EEG and eye-tracking technology we test various aspects of user experience (UX) and quality of experience (QoE).

  • Neuro-optimisation of web communications

    The measurement of attention, unconscious emotional response and memory encoding in all development phases enables to fine tune web communications for the human brain.

  • Neuro-optimisation of mobile applications and advertising

    Enables to neuroscientifically measure and optimise the development of mobile applications and various forms of content designed for mobile devices on different platforms.

The main organ for fun is the brain.

  • Neuro-optimisation of entertainment and events

    Using the analysis of unconscious brain processes and neuro-optimisation, we ensure that entertainment content and events of all forms and formats have the desired a(e)ffect on the target audience.

Visual identities

Man is evolutionary conditioned to recognise balanced design forms. Even with experienced designers, such design principles are a hit or a miss. Neurodesign leaves nothing to chance. Our approach works at the intersection of effective creative solutions and unconscious human aesthetic preferences.

Neurodesign of educational and promotional materials

The word is out. Infographics, pictograms, and icons are taking its place. The human brain is hungry for simple and visual representation of information. Armed with the latest insights of neuroscience and cognitive psychology, we transform educational publications, promotional materials, annual reports, and other materials into brain friendly communication tools.

Development and neurodesign of websites and web content

We plan and design websites and other web content by taking into account the specifics of human unconscious perception and organisation of information from the environment. With our neuro web design, we make sure that our web solutions are rich in content, cognitively easily comprehensible and emotionally engaging.

Neuro-optimised audio & video products

We produce various audio and video products that are compatible with the unconscious preferences of target consumers and audiences.

Neurodesign of 3D visualisations

It is the brain that creates the perception of a 3D environment. We use neurodesign to create 3D visualisations and animations that can be used in marketing communications and for 3D modeling.

Neurodesign

Design & communications optimised
for the brain.

Man is a visual creature. We mostly think in images rather than words. In the process of evolution, the human brain has adapted with a specific way of organising information from the environment, which - with the help of unconscious emotional processes - is lightning fast.

In accordance with these neuroscientific principles, we provide a revolutionary new approach to design. The creative design process and neuro-optimisation, integrated into a unified solution of neurodesign, deliver awesome creative solutions with scientifically proven effectiveness.

About

BlackBox story.

In 1913, psychologist Watson argued that science can only be objective if it brackets off the internal workings of the human mind. Two decades later, Skinner, Watsons’ pupil, was even clearer: the human mind is a black box that will always remain inaccesible to science.

After that, all researchers could do was analyse input stimuli and output data obtained via observation, surveys, interviews and focus groups, while actual internal mind and emotional processes remained a mystery. The old paradigm of marketing research is still hostage to these flawed 20th century assumptions.

Neuroscience of the 21st century has changed everything. Our international team of PhDs and experts in cognitive psychology, consumer neuroscience, marketing, marketing research, and business anthropology enables you to open and penetrate into the blackbox of the human mind.

 

Contact Us

 

Ethics

BlackBox

Tel.: +386 31 204 712

email: look@insideblackbox.eu

Ethics

Social responsibility is key.

BlackBox adheres to the highest scientific and ethical standards accepted by NMSBA (Neuromarketing Science and Business Association). We collaborate only with socially responsible companies.

 

NMSBA Code of Ethics

 

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Social responsibility
BlackBox

BLACKBOX

Applied Neuroscience +
Neuromarketing + Neurodesign

BlackBox provides the next step in product development, marketing research, and communications. Our solutions are based on in-depth understanding of consumer experience obtained by advanced brain-imaging technology.

TRUSTED BY

    

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Modern neuroscience proves that a major part of human experience is happening at the unconscious level of the mind. Consumers therefore cannot accurately explain what motivates their behavior and how they really experience products, advertisements and brands. Using advanced biotechnology BlackBox provides direct insight into unconscious levels of the mind crucial for in-depth understanding of consumer behavior.

EXPERIENCE METRICS

One of the brain’s primary functions is collecting and processing sensory information from the environment. As the brain interprets this information, it generates experiences. Using advanced brain-imaging technology, it is therefore possible to measure the quality of experience directly, and predict behavior related to products, concepts, ideas, brands, and communications. We provide the following neuroexperience metrics:

Human attention is, by nature, selective, shiftable, and dispersed. In contemporary, information saturated society it is hence extremely difficult to get noticed. Using EEG and eye tracking technology, we scientifically measure and optimise the attention potential of brands, products, services, packaging and communications.
With the help of EEG technology we measure the left-right asymmetry of the frontal lobe of the neo-cortex that is related to emotional intensity and valence (positive/negative). Higher intensity of positive emotional response to your products and communications correlates with better consumer experience and higher purchase intent.
Using the latest scientific methods, we detect and analyse unconscious processes of memory encoding. This enables us to determine to which extent selected stimuli will be memorised and to predict the level of recall.

SOLUTIONS

Comprehensive understanding of consumer behaviour is essential for the success of companies operating in turbulent economic conditions. Using advanced brain-imaging technology, we provide companies with accurate analysis of their consumers, on the basis of which they can make scientifically informed business decisions and solve key marketing problems.

Research

Based on the measurement of the unconscious brain response we provide the next generation of advanced marketing research and consulting covering brands, products & services, packaging, pricing strategy, marketing communications, web communications and entertainment.

Neurodesign

Our design team conceptualizes creative solutions following the latest insights of neuroscience about the workings of the human brain. In addition the measurement of unconscious brain response is conducted throughout the design process, which makes sure that all our creative solutions are neuro-optimised.

We neurodesign visual identities, various publications & promotional materials, websites & other webcontent, audioproducts and 3D visualizations.

ABOUT

The old paradigm of marketing planning and research is the hostage of flawed 20th century assumptions, which held that human mind is a black box that will always remain inaccessible to science. Progress in neuroscience and advanced biotechnological possibilities of the 21st century have changed everything.

Our international team of PhD’s and experts in cognitive psychology, consumer neuroscience, marketing, marketing research, sociology and business anthropology enables you to open and penetrate into the blackbox of the human mind. We think inside the box in order to create innovative outside-the-box solutions.